Ballmer “everywhere I go I see paper and pencils; there is still room for innovation” #ebg

BallmerI attended an EBG (Electronic Business Group, an influential French e-business Think-Tank) conference on Nov 8 in Paris, at which Steve Ballmer was speaking. It has taken a while to process my notes but here they are at last, sometimes answering my questions about the future of Microsoft, sometimes not. However, undoubtedly, Ballmer has managed to captivate the massive audience in the small theatre room of the Espace Pierre Cardin at the Heart of Paris, France. Ballmer was interviewed by EBG’s founder and Secretary General, Pierre Reboul. Steve Ballmer is also a member of the board of directors of EBG.

There has been a great deal of questions asked about the future of Microsoft lately, with regard to their apparent inability to cope with the mobile market (even by Gates’s own admission). However, it would be wrong to think that Microsoft has lost the War even though it may have lost a few battles. As a matter of fact, the software giant from Redmond, Wash. is still very strong in many areas, including Business Cloud, enterprise collaboration (more than 70% market share with SharePoint, not to mention yammer), home gaming with the very successful Xbox platform, and of course, Microsoft office which is, like it or not, still broadly used, despite a flurry of free more or less open source office suites which are available from the Internet. Yet, Microsoft’s business models are challenged, Office is slowly turning into a pay per use model with Office 365 and Windows 8 is just about coming back to life after a much awaited 8.1 facelift a couple of weeks ago. So where is Microsoft headed? That is the question. Let us see what Steve Ballmer, the current CEO who is soon to retire, has to say about this, even though he has managed to evade quite a few questions…

Right after the introduction , Steve Ballmer answered a question about the newly released surface 2 tablet. “Surface 2, is the evidence that Microsoft is moving from regular PCs to becoming a device company” Steve Ballmer explained, therefore confirming the impression is that many analysts had had, after the announcement of the purchase of Nokia, or rather as part of Nokia as Mr Ballmer explained a few moments later.

Does that mean that Microsoft is going to stop working with OEMs? “I would say something different” Ballmer said. “We continue to work with OEMs, but we will produce more devices”. Microsoft is definitely choosing a different path from Apple, its model seems to be far more akin to Google’s, even though its business model is a lot different.

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A Free Yet Legal Copy of Microsoft Office on Your Tablet With Cloudon

Let’s make the most of the summer with a bit of light reading and what I would call the application of the week: cloudon. I have selected a number of applications which I find particularly good or changed my way of working, or of entertaining myself, unless it’s both. This week, I will dwell on the cloud on iPad application, which I find really extraordinary, and I really wonder whether these guys are making money out of this and how. Is this the latest mystery of the new economy?

We will start with a visit to the application website in order to confirm that the application is available both for android and iOS. The application is available for both iPhones and iPads, and I will focus on the iPad version here in this blog post.

Step number 1: once the location has been installed, fire it up. First and foremost you will have to fine-tune the settings so they have access to your online cloud discs: four spaces are available with cloud on, which you can use concurrently. As far as I’m concerned, I have set up Google drive and Skydrive (by Microsoft’s, by far my preferred, because I was one of the first users, so that I have access to 25 GB free of charge). I left dropbox and box on the side for the moment by can you back to it later and at them to my final if I so wish. All that is needed to complete this setup is to let cloud on access your online disc by clicking the button “authorise”.

Step number 2: once your online disc has been selected (here I chose Skydrive), the folder structure of your disk is then displayed to you, and you can choose the list or icon formats from the top menu.

Step number 3: Once I’ve changed the display to icon mode which I find more convenient, I can then select the folder in which I have stored all the draft pieces for my blog. I call it “blog posts”.

Step number 4: I then select the relevant blog piece in word format. I can see on the screen but it was last changed on 24 June at 7:39 AM.

Step number 5: once you’ve clicked on the right file, it is then downloaded from the Internet. It is subsequently displayed, see the following screen grab, directly on my tablet into a Microsoft word window, more or less identical to the one I have on my PC (in fact it is a simplified version of Microsoft Word 2010, similar to the one you can find Skydrive itself). The greatest weaknesses that I spot in this application, is in my minde the relative slowness of download of the file (even more so if the file is really big like the entirety of our forthcoming book typescript for instance). My hunch is that we will see performance improving significantly within the next few months if this kind of applications remain in the future. As a matter of fact, what we are witnessing here is more than just another application but the implementation of something which I have described many times on this blog, which is called “ubiquitous computing” and was invented, I mean the concept, by the late Mark Weiser in the late 1980s. The missing link though is connectivity, as always, even though enormous headway has been made in the past few years. My guess is that it will take another 2 to 3 years, maybe 5, before we enjoy seamless connectivity coverage, with the kind of comfort that I experience while sitting behind my PC, connected via Ethernet on my 100 Mbs fibre access.

Step number 6: I can then write directly into the file which is editable in real time ; in order to prove this I have underlined a word by clicking at length on it, which triggered the contextual Microsoft menu which everybody knows. This the tablet equivalent to the right click of the mouse on a computer

Step number 7: then click the icon on the top bar which represents a compass on the top right-hand side of the screen, and this will open the menu which will make it possible for you to create a new file: either a spreadsheet (maybe not the most convenient type of file for tablets), a wordprocessing Word document, or a PowerPoint presentation. I decide to choose the latter…

Step number 8:  I then rename this new file which will be saved directly  in the original folder.

Step number 9:  an empty PowerPoint file will then be opened , which I will be able to populate exactly as if I were on my computer,  with a simplified version of PowerPoint 2010. This is a simplified version,  but yet, it is very usable, and it caters for basic Microsoft templates for instance. in order to create a presentation with a personalised template, I recommend that you use a presentation which you have created beforehand (with no content preferably ) in order to make the most of all the available screen layouts. This will save you a lot of time and will make it unnecessary for you to spend hours twiddling page templates on the tablet which is not very convenient.  You can then focus on adding text but also clipart, images, video etc. It is in fact very easy for you to modify an existing PowerPoint presentation and even create one directly from the tablet, and then synchronise the file directly on your computer , or vice versa.  I remind you that, with Skydrive, you do not need to own a local version of Microsoft PowerPoint, because it is available online too. Personally, being a teacher and benefiting from the special teacher/student price for Microsoft Office, I still think that owning a local Microsoft license is preferable.

Beyond the fact that this application is nice and convenient and mostly free of charge, one may ask oneself a few questions. On the one hand, what will be the business model of Microsoft in the next few years ? I could actually bet on the fact that access to software will be increasingly “cloudified”, namely from the moment that connectivity is really improved and made seamless and ubiquitous. from then on, I really wonder whether software which you either install or download is a model which will survive for very long .  This, however , is the model on which Microsoft thrived for so many years. Besides,  I really have a few questions about the business model of cloudon itself; I mean beyond its potential acquisition by Microsoft one day.

I also found it very strange that cloudon has had little coverage on the Web since 2012 , even though a great number of downloads have already been  performed  by users . I would be surprised if the Palo Alto company decided to remain silent , and maybe one day , what Geoffrey Moore calls the early majority will catch up with the “visionaries , dreamers and doers”. Wired pointed out  rightfully  that  the application’s limits came from the fact that the data was stored on the cloud, which rendered the display a little blurry but usable anyhow. this is a valid remark, but I couldn’t find that problem with PowerPoint, which I found to be the most useful application of the three.

There are a few limits with regard to the use of this application in presentation mode, but in our case I would recommend a more specialised application which I will describe in a forthcoming blog post.  As Wired pointed out, it is still very difficult to use such applications in order to create a presentation from scratch and the use of cloud on is , probably for today, limited to minor edits.

My hunch is that the self-proclaimed “visionaries” of Palo Alto shall not be deterred.

Time will tell…

Storsimple’s Ursheet Parikh battles against “cloud washing” and redefines cloud computing with Hybrid Cloud strategy

note: this piece was originally written for the Orange Business Live blog

On November 15, after Zscaler, we visited Storsimple, provider of Hybrid Cloud technology. Ursheet Parikh is one of the 2 co-founders and the CEO of Storsimple, a promising start-up operating in the storage domain, based in Santa Clara, Calif.

Storsimple started in May 2009, at the bottom of the depression, after exceptional reception from the VCs. Prior to this, Ursheet was working at Cisco and before Cisco.  Storsimple is pioneering In-bound marketing, as opposed to top-down marketing, because they want to be acknowledged by their peers above eveything.  All engineers in the company have a 20+ years of experience in the storage industry, and having 15-20 of such people is according to Storsimple’s CEO a recipe for success.

Their approach has been very conservative, starting with a beta with a few customers and they are now planning to go live by the beginning of 2011. They have the financial backing to do this and they make sure that all the customers go through the beta test in a very thorough fashion. There are no small vendors left in storage and therefore, Storsimple is walking on eggs and thinks that they should build a business and not just a product, and they don’t want the start-up to finish when the initial product is delivered.

a cruisade against “cloudwashing”

Ursheet’s favourite word of the year is “cloudwashing”. He says that almost anyone is trying to sell stuff labelled as “cloud computing”, and “cloud washing” happens when vendors are selling things labelled as cloud computing when their solutions have nothing to do with it; yet, cloud computing is really important if it’s not trifled with.  For most CIOs, their budgets is a subset of revenue and IT can only do what its budget can achieve and this is why cloud computing is so appealing to IT managers. Enterprises need to embrace cloud computing just to stay in sync with competition. So much so that Urshreet thinks that the leaders in that space in a few years won’t be the equipment manufacturers but service providers like Orange Business Services. “A new set of players delivering IT as a service are cropping up and they will come to the fore”, Ursheet said.

different levels of cloud computing strategies … plus a new one

CXOs have different options in terms of cloud computing strategy depending on their requirement:

  • SAAS, for which apps move to the cloud
  • PAAS (platform as a service), for which apps have to be rewritten
  • Public cloud compute with vendors like Amazon EC2
  • Public storage with Amazon S3 for instance
  • Private cloud technology, with vendors like EMC Atmos

all of these strategies have issues (re. slide above) and Storsimple is adding an option to that list with what they call their Hybrid cloud strategy, which in Ursheet’s mind is addressing the full spectrum of the requirement, from core services and security to the end-user. Yet, Storsimple is not working against storage nor cloud service providers, Ursheet Parikh added, on the contrary;  it is aimed at providing a front-end interface to these vendors’ hardware and cloud solutions.

the problem: data explosion in the data life cycle

Collaboration has become a must if one wants to avoid the explosion of the amount of content and the amount of copies of files that exist. De-duplication is helping but it doesn’t necessarily solve the issue Ursheet said: even with de-duplication, companies still back up vast amounts of data and move them around across servers. This is what is called “content communism” i.e. that no one wants to know what is there and no one wants to clear the data. What Storsimple is doing is to analyse the working set, put that in local storage and use central storage for the rest. Now, the challenge with cloud computing usage are integration, performance and security.

the solution: hybrid storage by Storsimple

with hybrid storage in the Microsoft enterprise environment as seen by Storsimple can be summed up in a few points:

  1. instant provisioning is made available,
  2. the storage disk is made available straight from the user’s desktop, as a separate network iSCSI hard drive but instead of being in the private cloud of the client, it is stored centrally,
  3. Storage performance is managed centrally by Storsimple through tiered storage (SSD, SAS and Cloud), weighted storage layout and real-time de-duplication.

One of the most striking function offered by Storsimple is that which goes by the name of “Cloud clones”. Storsimple Cloud clones are snapshots of current data changes and are stored in the cloud, as if some kind of mirroring, but not in real time. This is making backups and disaster recovery (DR) far easier and less complex according to Storsimple’s CEO. Snapshots can be done every 4 hours (whatever frequency clients want) and data is saved centrally on the cloud every now and then. This operation is transparent for users and is not wearing on the performance of each individual desktop. Clones can be launched overnight in case users or enterprises prefer to do so. In terms of Cloud acceleration, there is a home-developed algorithm to optimise local storage vs. central storage and include compression so as not to put the burden on the user.

Pricing is done only on hardware capacity (ingested content, so you don’t pay for the compressed footprint but for the uncompressed one), all the functionality is included. The end result is an average 80-90% cost reduction for clients.

Sharepoint

Ursheet concluded by saying that this solution is very well suited to Sharepoint too, mainly when it comes to solving the huge storage issues related to Microsoft’s online file sharing service. Archival online is also possible, therefore putting an end to this “content communism” issue highlighted above, thanks to compression and remote data retrieval.

Microsoft at blogwell 3 : listening in the social media era

The first presentation at BlogWell number three in New York, was that of Nestor Portillo, worldwide director of community and online support for Microsoft. There are hundreds of products and services at Microsoft, and by global operations, Microsoft means that it has direct presence in 80 countries. There are many forums in which one can answer questions and initiate conversations, and to be honest, this is not really new to Microsoft.
Internally, there are more than 5000 blogs at Microsoft already, which are aimed at tackling various subjects such as technology, products and services. Some are team blogs, some individual blogs some are Corporate blogs and so on and there are even blogs for some of Microsoft’s VP’s. Mr. Portillo was involved in social media three years ago are, which means actually working on blogs, twitter etc.
  • read on at http://blogs.orange-business.com