Discovery Channel on Shark Week at Blogwell: “enthusiasts are doing our marketing”

ShareTweetShareDiscovery Channel were the 3rd presenters in track1 of Blogwell on November 9 in Philadelphia with Amber Harris and Gayle Weiswasser delivering the presentation. Shark week is one of the … Read More

Social Media: Beyond the ROI issue

The blog Council is an association in charge of promoting social media usage by and for the benefit of so-called “big logos”. Among the members one will find corporations like GM, Wells Fargo, Procter & Gamble, Kmart and of course Orange Business Services (proudly represented by yours truly).

The council is not just in charge of promoting the usage of social media in the enterprise world. It is of course a – very private – club enabling heads of Internet from major companies around the world to get together and exchange tips and ideas. But the council has also decided to turn itself into a publisher in order to let its members share their vision of the ROI of corporate blogging. Calls for papers were issued by the council late September 2008, and members sent their contributions by October 13 as planned. All contributions will be combined and put together into a collective book which will be published by the council. Much more will be said about that book during the blog Council conference which is planned for the end of October in San Jose.

Internet Information glut: a case of pearls before swine

Poor is the substance, alas! and yet I’ve read all the books(1) was Stephane Mallarme’s introduction to “Brise Marine” a cryptic yet exalted poem in which the author was venting his Baudelairian ‘spleen’ (i.e. in its archaic sense something like the modern ‘blues’ or existential malaise – Merriam & Websters meaning 3), and the urge to flee towards new horizons as if a refreshing breeze from the sea (hence the title) was enticing him to leave his home, everything mundane and above all his new-born child who kept him awake at night and prevented him from creating. Such was the thought that came to my mind when I came across Michael Kinsley’s article in Time magazine entitled ‘too much information’.